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New Carissa, 1999
  PREPARATIONS CONTINUE TO TOW THE NEW CARISSA
  UNIFIED COMMAND CONFIRMS EARLIER REPORT OF VESSEL CONDITION
  HELICOPTER ACTIVITES UNDERWAY TO PREPARE FOR NEW CARISSA'S TOW TO SEA
  NUMBERS ESTABLISHED TO REPORT OILED WILDLIFE, RECEIVE CLEANUP TRAINING
  CREWS COMPLETE PREPARATIONS TO NEW TOWLINE, EXPECT TO MAKE CONNECTION TOMORROW
  ESTIMATED NUMBER OF BIRDS IMPACTED BY OIL FROM THE NEW CARISSA REPORTED
  CREWS EXPECT TO SPEND MORNING CONNECTING TUG AND BOW OF NEW CARISSA
  SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS SOUGHT BY THE UNIFIED COMMAND INDICATES OIL ON BEACHES MAY BE FROM NEW CARISSA
  BOW OF NEW CARISSA BEGINS TO TURN TOWARD SEA
  BOW OF NEW CARISSA FACING WEST
  EFFORTS TO REFLOAT BOW OF NEW CARISSA WILL CONTINUE EARLY TOMORROW MORNING
  REMAINING WESTERN SNOWY PLOVERS RELEASED FROM REHABILITATION IN COOS BAY
  BOW OF NEW CARISSA BEGINS TRIP TO SEA
  COMMERCIAL SHELLFISH HARVESTING AND RECREATIONAL CLAMMING REOPENED IN YAQUINA BAY
  BOW OF NEW CARISSA TRAVELS 40 MILES DURING FIRST DAY AT SEA
  TUG SEA VICTORY AND BOW OF NEW CARISSA MAKING GOOD PROGRESS
  NEW CARISSA MIDWAY TO FINAL RESTING PLACE
  BEACH CLEAN UP EFFORTS CONTINUE
  UNIFIED COMMAND BEGINS IMPLEMENTING PLAN FOR STERN OF NEW CARISSA
  OFFICIALS DECIDE ON PLAN FOR SINKING BOW OF NEW CARISSA
  NAVY DESTROYER DAVID R. RAY ARRIVES AT SINKING SITE
  BOW OF NEW CARISSA SINKS TO RESTING SITE
  OIL SKIMMER OREGON RESPONDER DOES NOT FIND OIL AFTER BOW OF NEW CARISSA SINKS
  OVERFLIGHT OF NEW CARISSA RESTING SITE FINDS VERY LITTLE OIL

OIL SKIMMER OREGON RESPONDER DOES NOT FIND OIL AFTER BOW OF NEW CARISSA SINKS

Waldport, Ore., March 12, 1999 1200 hours

Oil initially reported after the bow of the New Carissa went down in more than 10,000 feet of water yesterday could not be located by the Oregon Responder, the tugs Sea Victory and Natoma or the fishing vessel Miss Law.

"The commanding officer of the USS David R. Ray, the Navy destroyer that was assigned to the sinking operation, initially reported that he saw an oil slick about 1,000 yards wide," said Bill Milwee, a salvage expert for Gallagher Marine Systems and a member of the Unified Command. "But there were four ships out there yesterday afternoon looking for oil until nightfall, and they didn't find anything."

The tugboat Sea Victory, which towed the bow to a designated spot 282.5 nautical miles off the Oregon coast, the tugboat Natoma, which was supporting the Sea Victory, and the Miss Law, a support vessel for the Oregon Responder, had been waiting a number of miles away from the bow during the sinking operations, for safety reasons. All four vessels responded as soon as oil was reported and circled the area until dark Thursday evening. None of the ships located any oil.

Clean up crews continue to find fewer tarballs on the beaches from Coos Bay, Ore., north to Lincoln City, Ore., and the tarballs are decreasing in size. Beaches from Newport to south of Cape Perpetua will be cleaned today and throughout the weekend. In addition, a team will respond to reports of tarballs in Washburne State Park, north of Heceta Head.

Officials from the International Bird Research and Rescue Center continue to work with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to survey the amount of wildlife affected by the two groundings of the New Carissa. To date, 201 birds have been through the rehabilitation center, 172 of those with oil on them. A total of 640 birds have died, and 285 had oil on them. Wildlife teams will survey beaches today from Heceta Head north to Siletz Bay.

"The good news is that at least 82 percent of the oil onboard the New Carissa never reached the wildlife or the pristine shoreline of Oregon's coast," said Captain Mike Hall, U.S. Coast Guard and a member of the Unified Command.



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