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New Carissa, 1999
  PREPARATIONS CONTINUE TO TOW THE NEW CARISSA
  UNIFIED COMMAND CONFIRMS EARLIER REPORT OF VESSEL CONDITION
  HELICOPTER ACTIVITES UNDERWAY TO PREPARE FOR NEW CARISSA'S TOW TO SEA
  NUMBERS ESTABLISHED TO REPORT OILED WILDLIFE, RECEIVE CLEANUP TRAINING
  CREWS COMPLETE PREPARATIONS TO NEW TOWLINE, EXPECT TO MAKE CONNECTION TOMORROW
  ESTIMATED NUMBER OF BIRDS IMPACTED BY OIL FROM THE NEW CARISSA REPORTED
  CREWS EXPECT TO SPEND MORNING CONNECTING TUG AND BOW OF NEW CARISSA
  SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS SOUGHT BY THE UNIFIED COMMAND INDICATES OIL ON BEACHES MAY BE FROM NEW CARISSA
  BOW OF NEW CARISSA BEGINS TO TURN TOWARD SEA
  BOW OF NEW CARISSA FACING WEST
  EFFORTS TO REFLOAT BOW OF NEW CARISSA WILL CONTINUE EARLY TOMORROW MORNING
  REMAINING WESTERN SNOWY PLOVERS RELEASED FROM REHABILITATION IN COOS BAY
  BOW OF NEW CARISSA BEGINS TRIP TO SEA
  COMMERCIAL SHELLFISH HARVESTING AND RECREATIONAL CLAMMING REOPENED IN YAQUINA BAY
  BOW OF NEW CARISSA TRAVELS 40 MILES DURING FIRST DAY AT SEA
  TUG SEA VICTORY AND BOW OF NEW CARISSA MAKING GOOD PROGRESS
  NEW CARISSA MIDWAY TO FINAL RESTING PLACE
  BEACH CLEAN UP EFFORTS CONTINUE
  UNIFIED COMMAND BEGINS IMPLEMENTING PLAN FOR STERN OF NEW CARISSA
  OFFICIALS DECIDE ON PLAN FOR SINKING BOW OF NEW CARISSA
  NAVY DESTROYER DAVID R. RAY ARRIVES AT SINKING SITE
  BOW OF NEW CARISSA SINKS TO RESTING SITE
  OIL SKIMMER OREGON RESPONDER DOES NOT FIND OIL AFTER BOW OF NEW CARISSA SINKS
  OVERFLIGHT OF NEW CARISSA RESTING SITE FINDS VERY LITTLE OIL

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF BIRDS IMPACTED BY OIL FROM THE NEW CARISSA REPORTED

Waldport, Ore., March 5, 1999 2000 hours

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the US Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that a total of 99 oiled birds have been through rehabilitation since the New Carissa was first grounded in Coos Bay, and 105 oiled birds have been found dead.

"Environmentally, the two beachings of the New Carissa on the Oregon Coast are considered a single incident," said Rebecca Goggans, a biologist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. "Oiled birds may travel significant distances, and there is no way for us to tell where a bird might have been affected. Birds found with oil on their feathers in Waldport may have come in contact with the oil in Coos Bay, and vice versa."

Individuals who find oiled or dead birds or other wildlife on the beaches should not handle the wildlife. They should call (541) 563-7614 between 7:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. PST and give the amount of oil seen on the wildlife and its location.

Since Tuesday night, when the bow section arrived in Waldport, about 2,000 gallons of oil have leaked, according to analysis from the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. The Unified Command believes about 50,000 to 70,000 gallons of oil leaked from the New Carissa when it was in Coos Bay, and about 10,000 to 14,000 gallons of that evaporated.

Survey crews on March 4 and 5 reported an estimated 20 percent of live birds seen between Yachats and Yaquina Bay are oiled. This is consistent with results in Coos Bay. The most current numbers for wildlife affected since the New Carissa first leaked oil on February 8, 1999 follow:

 

  • A total of 116 birds have been through the International Bird Research and Rescue Center (IBRRC) set up in Coos Bay.
  • Of the 116 birds that have gone through rehabilitation, 99 had visible oil on them. A total of 50 birds have been released from rehabilitation.
  • There are currently 10 snowy plovers in rehabilitation. Seven were released last Friday, February 26.
  • 242 birds have been found dead since the vessel first leaked oil; 105 of those had visible oil on them.
  • Biologists will not know the cause of death of the other 137 until post mortem exams are performed. They believe some may have died from winter storms, disease, starvation, predation or some may have ingested oil.



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